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Your child paid attention in math class, studied their notes and did the algebra problem sets twice. Everything should be falling into place for them, but for some reason the concepts just won’t stick.

If this sounds familiar, it might be time to get your child a bit of extra help. You’ll want to choose a tutor who’s going to work well with their unique personality and learning style. With the wrong tutor, students can get even more discouraged, but, with the right math tutor, students can discover their academic potential and build self-confidence in new and exciting ways.

But how can you tell what makes a good teacher for your child? Answer these four questions and you will be a long way towards determining if a tutor is actually a good teacher and if they are a good match for your child, before they ever meet.

1. How well do they know the subject?

Obviously if the tutor can’t teach math, then nothing else really will help, so we need to start here. But how can you figure out if they know their stuff if you haven’t taken an algebra or calculus class in twenty years? Check to see if they majored in math or a science that would require solid math fundamentals (like physics, chemistry or biology). If they don’t have a degree in these areas, have they taught the class or subject in a classroom?

If your student is in high school or college, it’s important to choose a math tutor with a depth of knowledge. In this case, a good rule of thumb is to make sure that a math tutor can teach at least one course level above your student. For example if you are looking for a high school precalculus tutor, you also want to make sure that the tutor can teach calculus. If your student is studying pre-algebra, their tutor should certainly have a mastery over algebra (through algebra 2, preferably). Having this base of knowledge means that the math tutor is going to be able to help your child dive deeply into the subject. A math tutor whose knowledge ends at your student’s grade level may not be able to explain the “why” behind important concepts.

2. How good are they at actually teaching?

Just because someone earned perfect grades in their calculus course doesn’t mean they’re automatically good at teaching that material. Do you see any evidence that the tutor is able to communicate complex topics simply and effectively? Do they cite experience working with different kinds of learners when you speak with them on the phone? When you choose a tutor, you want to look for tutors who talk about their passion for teaching, the joy they get from helping students, and the reasons they tutor. Most educators who take the time to talk about these things are genuinely passionate about helping students.

Of course, the best way to see if they are a good tutor is to actually watch them teach. Some sites, like Smart Alec, actually include video math lessons so you can see how individual tutors communicate and teach.

3. How successful have they been?

When choosing a tutor, look to their track record with students. If you’re going through a company or service, ask how they selected the tutors they work with. Do they have to have a certain number of hours tutors have to fulfill or specific qualifying credentials? If not, are there reviews? You obviously want a tutor who has proven they can help students succeed. You can either limit your search to only looking at tutoring companies that have stringent tutor-hiring requirements or you can look on sites like Wyzant that have many reviews of tutors to help you.

If you’re nervous about the teacher’s quality (or if you just want more of a sense of how the tutor teaches), ask them for a few references. Talking to former – or current – students will give you a sense of how the teacher communicates and if they can actually adapt their expertise to your child’s needs.

4. Are they a good personality fit for your child?

Once a tutor meets all the other requirements, you should choose a tutor that your student actually wants to work with. The wrong personality fit can mean the difference between a successful lesson and a painful one. You know your child best, so think about whether they need a more authoritative teacher or if they’re going to respond better to a more relatable one. Will they connect with a math tutor who is very energetic and animated or one that is more reserved and calm?

This is where bringing your child into the decision making process can really pay off, especially if you have an initial consultation at a tutoring company or a tutor’s profile up on your computer. If your child thinks the math tutor looks like someone they may want to work with, letting them make the final call can go a long way towards having them buy into the tutoring process and ultimately making the tutoring relationship more productive.

So don’t just go with the first math tutor you come across. Look at how deep their knowledge goes, how good they are at communicating that information, how successful they are, and finally, whether or not your child is going to respond to their personality. With the right math tutor, your child will be feeling more confident and capable in no time.

2 thoughts on “How to Choose a Tutor in 4 Questions

  1. I liked when you talked about choosing a tutor who’s personality matches those who will be learning. It makes sense that taking the time to do this can help you make sure they tutoring is productive and worth the while. I can see how anyone looking into this would want to consult with several people and compare them in order to find the best.

    Like

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