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For 7th graders, spring is an exciting time of year filled with field trips, school dances, and fun academic projects and competitions.

But if you’re thinking about applying to one of New York City’s nine specialized High Schools in fall 2018, it’s also time to start thinking about the SHSAT.

Last summer, we shared some ways students can prepare for the test. Since then, there have been major changes to the test that all students planning to take the exam should know about.  

I Need a Refresher… What’s the SHSAT?

The SHSAT is the scholastic achievement examination used as the sole factor to determine admissions to New York City’s Specialized High Schools (with the exception of LaGuardia High School).

Who Takes the SHSAT, and When?

All current New York City residents in 8th grade or in 9th grade for the first time who plan to apply to one of the Specialized High Schools must take the SHSAT.

The SHSAT is administered in the fall (mid-October for 8th graders, mid-November for 9th graders) for admission to Specialized High Schools in the following school year (i.e., students seeking admission for September 2019 will take the test in fall 2018).

What’s “New” About the New SHSAT, anyway?

The fall 2018 Specialized High Schools Admissions Test (SHSAT) will have an updated test design.

  1. There are fewer multiple choice answer choices. All multiple choice items will have 4 answer choices instead of 5 answer choices.
  2. Some questions don’t count towards students’ scores. Each section of the 2018 SHSAT includes 10 items (of the 57 total) that are not counted in the student’s score but that are being tried out – or “field tested” – for possible use in future SHSAT tests. You will NOT know which items are scored and which are field test items, so you should try to answer all items in each section.
  3. It’s now 20% longer! The overall testing time has been increased to 180 minutes (from 150 minutes previously). 
  4. The section ordering is up to the student. Students may choose to complete either the English Language Arts or Mathematics section first.
  5. The Verbal Section is now the ELA Section. There have been changes to the Verbal/ELA Section (even from the 2017 test), which you can read about below.

What’s actually tested on the “New” SHSAT?

The SHSAT has two sections: English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS SECTION (57 QUESTIONS)

The English Language Arts (ELA) section consists of two parts:

  1. Revising/Editing. The Revising/Editing section may have up to 11 total questions. Revising/Editing items assess students’ ability to recognize and correct language errors and to improve the overall quality of a piece of writing.
  2. Reading Comprehension. There are up to 48 items in Reading Comprehension.
    Reading Comprehension requires students to read five or six passages, each of which is followed by up to ten questions assessing students’ ability to understand, analyze, and interpret what they have read.

MATHEMATICS SECTION (57 QUESTIONS)

The Mathematics section consists of word problems and computational questions with either a multiple-choice or grid-in answers. There are 5 grid-in Math items and 52 multiple-choice items. The Mathematics section asks students to solve word and computational problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Some word and computational problems will also include working with fractions, decimals, and statistics.

So, How Do I Prepare for the SHSAT?

If you’re thinking of applying for admission to a Specialized High School in 2019, the summer before 8th grade is the perfect time to get a head start on preparing for the fall exam.

To begin preparation, you can purchase an official SHSAT study guide. You can also consider getting a private tutor to help build familiarity with the question types and content of the exam.

If you’d like expert one-on-one help preparing for the exam, Smart Alec has dozens of excellent SHSAT tutors available throughout New York.

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