Have you ever had an English teacher make any of the following comments on your paper?

  • “Unclear”
  • “Run-on sentence”
  • “Rephrase”

If so, chances are that your paper could be improved by sounding a bit more like Ernest Hemingway. His clear, economic language carries both beauty and efficiency, as you can read in the passage below

“In the morning I walked down the Boulevard to the rue Soufflot for coffee and brioche. It was a fine morning. The horse-chestnut trees in the Luxembourg gardens were in bloom. There was the pleasant early-morning feeling of a hot day. I read the papers with the coffee and then smoked a cigarette. The flower-women were coming up from the market and arranging their daily stock. Students went by going up to the law school, or down to the Sorbonne. The Boulevard was busy with trams and people going to work.”

                                                                              – The Sun Also Rises

Luckily for you, there’s a powerful online tool that can help you clean up your prose. The Hemingway Editor is an online tool that will help you edit a text in pursuit of clean, clear writing in the style of the cherished American author.

So, how does the Hemingway tool work? It’s as simple as his prose. Take whatever text you are working on and copy and paste it into Hemingway. Your passage will be given a score on readability and an estimation on how long it will take on average to read. The Hemingway app will highlight different aspects of your text that need attention, and explain different ways to sharpen your work. Whether you need to simplify your writing, strengthen your prose, or shake up your literary style, Hemingway is here to help! Here are the issues that the app will help you overcome:

  1. The adverb. Hemingway will go through your text and highlight in blue any uses of adverbs, suggesting you keep them to a minimum. As we know from Schoolhouse Rock, adverbs are words that modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. While it may appear odd to disavow an entire part of speech, adverbs can often be a symptom of weak writing. Why use an adverb when you can just use a stronger or more accurate verb? By drawing attention to the adverbs, Hemingway is going to help you reconsider your verb choices.
  2. Second is the unholiest of unholies and the bane of your English teacher’s existence: the passive voice. The passive voice is a grammatical voice where the subject appears passive in regards to the predicate, as opposed to actively carrying out the action. For example, “Our troops defeated the enemy” is active, while “The enemy was defeated by our troops” is passive. The passive voice with be highlighted green so you can strike it out and turn it active, just like Ernest would have.
  3. The last three tools will draw attention to sections of the text that are messy or lack clarity. Highlights in purple and yellow will address hard to read phrases and hard to read sentences, respectively. Just like your school teacher’s red pen, the red highlight is reserved for sentences that are particularly unclear or hard to read.

Here’s an example of the tool in action:

Billy closed the classroom door firmly, and there was an excruciatingly loud noise that prompted everyone to cover their ears. Billy was looked at by everyone with their menacing stares. 

Using the Hemingway tool suggestions, the paragraph could be rewritten as:

Billy slammed the classroom door. There was an excruciating noise that prompted everyone to cover their ears. Everyone looked at Billy with their menacing stares.

So give it a shot! Try this tool and before you know it, you’ll be putting the final touches on The Sun Also Rises 2. Just take it easy on the booze and the big game hunting.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s